How to: Turn your favorite iOS game’s music and sound files into Ringtones and text alerts

One of the side effects of playing a particularly addictive iPhone game is that quite often you find the soundtrack running through your head at night as you try to sleep, almost BEGGING to be used to make the world’s most annoying ringtone. But how to go about it? Sure, you could try to record the sound into your Mac via the audio jack as you play, but odds are that music will also come along with some extra bleeps and bloops from the game and you jump, shoot, etc. Wouldn’t it be great if you could just get at the raw music files? And what ABOUT those bleeps and bloops? Wouldn’t those make kick-ass text-alert sounds? Well it turns out you can grab those files, and it’s pretty easy. Here’s how.

Step One: Find the game you want to grab files from by right-clicking (option clicking) in iTunes and choose SHOW IN FINDER.

How to get files used in iOS games

This will open up a finder window with the game highlit.

How to get files used in iOS games

Step Two: Right-click on the file and choose DUPLICATE. This way we don’t accidentally screw up your original app.
How to get files used in iOS games

Step Three: Rename your copy by changing the copy’s file extension from “.ipa” to “.zip”. (Optionally, you can drag your copy to your desktop or somewhere outside your app folder to avoid confusion).

How to get files used in iOS games

How to get files used in iOS games

Step Four: Right click on the new ZIP file, and choose to open it (basically you are unzipping it).

How to get files used in iOS games

You should now see a folder

How to get files used in iOS games

Step Five: Open that folder. Inside you should see a few files. Open up the PAYLOAD folder.

How to get files used in iOS games

Step Six: There’s probably only 1 file in there.

How to get files used in iOS games

Right-click that and choose SHOW PACKAGE CONTENTS.

How to get files used in iOS games

This file is really just a fancily-wrapped folder, and choosing to show package contents just shows you all the files inside that folder.

Step Seven: Well, you’re basically done, as the files you want are in this folder. Just sort the Finder window BY KIND, and look for the music, sound, graphic, or movie file you want.

How to get files used in iOS games

Step Eight: Now, if you are looking to grab a music file, odds are it is in the .caf file format, and iTunes cannot play it.

How to get files used in iOS games

However, QuickTime CAN. So right-click that file and choose OPEN WITH and choose QUICKTIME.

How to get files used in iOS games

Now you can export that file as a .M4A file. If it’s short enough you can take that “.m4a” file and change the extension to “.m4r” and just drag it into itunes to use it as a ringtone. If it’s longer than 40 seconds, or you only want a specific part of the song, you’ll need a 3rd party ringtone-making utility.

How to get files used in iOS games

FYI, for creating ringtones, I use the apps Ringer ($3.99) icon, and iRingtones ($1.99) icon available in the Mac App Store. It’s fairly straight forward so I won’t go into a full tutorial on it here.

How to get files used in iOS games

So there you go. You can now make unique ringtones, Text Alert sounds and more that will remind you of your favorite iOS games and annoy everyone around you.

Comments
4 Responses to “How to: Turn your favorite iOS game’s music and sound files into Ringtones and text alerts”
  1. ArtOfWarfare says:

    Just thought I’d let you know that you can also use Garage Band to make the file into a ringtone.

    from memory the steps are:
    1 – Drag and drop the file into garage band (not sure if .caf will work, but .mp3 or .m4a should,)
    2 – Click the loop button (to the right of the play/pause/fastword buttons.)
    3 – Drag and stretch the yellow bar until it covers the portion of the sound file you’d like to use.
    4 – The share menu has an option to send to iTunes as a Ringtone

    The steps are something like that. I haven’t done this in a few months.

  2. John says:

    I just tried this with a fairly short (less than one second) clip. QuickTime converted the .caf file easily and I was able to import it into Garageband. However, and oddly enough, it doesn’t play in Garageband. It plays just fine on the desktop so I know the converted file works.

    So it tried just renaming the file extension to .m4r. I dragged that to iTunes and it immediately went into the ringtones section. Synced my iPhone and sure enough it’s there and working.

    Thanks, Doc! Cool information here.

  3. Logan says:

    How do I do this in iTunes 11.0.2.26? I can’t find “Show in Finder”.

  4. Logan says:

    Actually, nevermind that. How do I do this in Windows 7?

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